Unwrap the facts

Munch Better Brownies have clean and simple ingredients that are easy to pronounce and understand. We are proud having “NO BAD STUFF!”

Independent third-party testing (EMSL Analytical, Inc.) confirmed:

  • A leading 22grams of Protein;
  • More Iron than a serving of Spinach;
  • The Right sugar added (not artificial, not alcohol based)
  • More Potassium than a Banana;
  • No Artificial:
  • Sweeteners
  • Flavors
  • Preservatives
  • Colors
  • Benefits of Sea Salt
  • The Right Oil Used - Avocado Oil

Our Brownies, unlike others, has 2 major factors in blocking Insulin (Blood Sugar) Spikes. First is our leading 22 grams of Protein, and Second is our selection of Coconut Palm Sugar. Studies found that foods, like ours, that contain Inulin can be healthy choices for people concerned about sugar spikes, including those with Diabetes.

A 2023 Study published in the National Library of Medicine stated that “Coconut sugar is a healthier, sweeter option than the majority of other sugars that are commercially available.” In fact, WebMD called Coconut Palm Sugar an “ideal choice” for a natural, plant-based sweetener to keep your energy levels up.

The Cleveland Clinic in 2023 published that “Often labeled as ‘diabetic-friendly’ or “calorie-free”, this sugar substitutes warrants caution.” It further stated that “Your body can easily digest sugar and use it for energy … But it can’t absorb or fully digest sugar alcohols.” These artificial sugars/sweeteners have been linked to GI issues, laxative effect and weight gain.

Longitudinal cohort studies found a positive association between the consumption of artificial sweeteners and the risk of hypertension, stroke, and cardiovascular events. Thus, although the use of artificial sweeteners (sugar alcohol) seem promising in assisting weight loss, these artificial sweeteners have been linked to a variety of health concerns, including obesity and its related cardiometabolic disturbances.

The World Health Organization (WHO) released in 2023 a new guideline on non-sugar sweeteners. “The recommendation is based on the findings of a systematic review of the available evidence which suggests that use of non-sugar sweeteners does not confer any long-term benefit in reducing body fat in adults or children. Results of the review also suggest that there may be potential undesirable effects from long-term use of NSS, such as an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and

mortality in adults." Replacing free sugars with non-sugar sweeteners does not help with weight control in the long term. People need to consider other ways to reduce free sugars intake” says Francesco Branca, WHO Director for Nutrition and Food Safety.

Per Serving, Coconut Sugar contains inulin, a type of soluble fiber that lessons post-meal blood sugar spikes. WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-coconut-sugar

Coconut Sugar: Chemical Analysis and Nutritional Profile https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9964017/

A High Protein Diet Is More Effective in Improving Insulin Resistance and Glycemic Variability Compared to a Mediterranean Diet—A Cross-Over Controlled Inpatient Dietary Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8707429/

Cleveland Clinic, 2023, What You Should Know About Sugar Alcohols, (clevelandclinic.org)

The Impact of Artificial Sweeteners on Body Weight Control and Glucose Homeostasis, National Library of Medicine, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7817779/

WHO Advises Against Non-Sugar Sweeteners, May 2023 https://www.worldbakers.com/ingredient/who-advises-against-non-sugar-sweeteners-for-weight-control/

It’s natural to think that foods labeled as “no sugar” or “less sugar” must be better for us. And artificial sweeteners can sound like a better choice than sugar, especially if you’re living with diabetes, following a keto diet or looking to lose weight or eat heathier. But in truth, that might not be the case. A growing body of evidence suggests artificial sweeteners “can be worse for you than table sugar.” By example, recent research is connecting one particular artificial sweetener, erythritol, with some “very serious health risks.” Per the Cleveland Clinic 2023. Dr. Stanley Hazen, MD and PhD, a specialist in preventive cardiovascular medicine who was the senior author of the study.

The American Diabetes Association published “A Word of Caution” on Sugar Alcohols. They states “It’s also important to know that at this time, there is no clear evidence to suggest that using sugar substitutes will help with managing blood sugar or weight or improving cardiometabolic health in the long run.”

Similarly, the National Institute of Health published a 2023 finding “reveal that erythritol (common sugar alcohol) is both associated with incident MACE risk and fosters enhanced thrombosis.”

The American Diabetes Association published in 2023 a study showing the relationship between artificial sweeteners and risk of type 2 diabetes. To quote the study “These findings of positive associations between artificial sweetener intakes and increased T2D risk strengthen the evidence that these additives may not be safe sugar alternatives. This study provides important insights in the context of on-going reevaluation of artificial sweeteners by health authorities worldwide.”

The Mayo Clinic stated that artificial sweeteners “may not be as beneficial as once thought…. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea.” - M. Regina Castro, M.D.

Cleveland Clinic Study Finds Common Artificial Sweetener Linked to Higher Rates of Heart Attack and Stroke, February 2023, https://newsroom.clevelandclinic.org/2023/02/27/cleveland-clinic-study-finds-common-artificial-sweetener-linked-to-higher-rates-of-heart-attack-and-stroke/

Diabetes & Food, American Diabetes Association, Get to Know Carbs, https://diabetes.org/food-nutrition/understanding-carbs/get-to-know-carbs

National Library of Medicine; March 2023, The artificial sweetener erythritol and cardiovascular event risk - PubMed (nih.gov) Nat Med. 2023 Mar;29(3):710-718. doi: 10.1038/s41591-023-02223-9. Epub 2023 Feb 27

Diabetes Care, July 2023, American Diabetes Association, Artificial Sweeteners and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes https://diabetesjournals.org/care/article/46/9/1681/153434/Artificial-Sweeteners-and-Risk-of-Type-2-Diabetes

Mayo Clinic, Artificial sweeteners: Any effect on Blood Sugar? https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-answers/artificial-sweeteners/faq-20058038

The result of our trade secret recipe is about 50% more Iron than an equivalent serving size of Spinach per the USDA Agricultural Research Service.

A 2023 Clinical Trial found that Iron is key for oxygen transport and energy metabolism for exercise capacity and to prevent shortness of breath and exhaustion during exercise. A lack of iron can strongly affect physical work capacity by reducing oxygen transport to muscles.

Spinach, raw 10/30/2020 https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/1103136/nutrients

Influence of iron supplementation on fatigue, mood states and sweating profiles. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9932653/

The great marketing gimmick to fool you.

There is “no legal definition of “net” “active” or “impact” carbs for food labels, so essentially it is a marketing gimmick to cover their use of artificial sweeteners and other similar ingredients. "These terms have been made up by food companies," says Wahida Karmally, DrPH, RD, director of nutrition at the Irving Center for Clinical Research at Columbia University. "It's a way for the manufacturers of these products to draw attention to them and make them look appealing by saying, 'Look, you can eat all these carbs, but you're really not impacting your health, so to speak.'"

Health and diabetes authorities are cautious on the terms “net carb” as The American Diabetes Association tells patients that ‘the term “net carbs” does not have a legal definition and is not used by the Food and Drug Administration or recognized by American Diabetes Association’ and recommends using total carbohydrates.

First, this net carb count is a misleading as it does not consider the more important Protein to Carb Ratio (by example we have a high ratio = 22g of Protein to 20g of Carbs).

Second, brands promoting their “net carb count” utilize artificial sweeteners / sugar alcohol to bring about the benefit of a lower count (“artificially” lower their count). Please read above about the risks of sugar alcohol compared to our natural Coconut Palm Sugar.

As to the Protein to Carb Ratio, is best used with foods that you will eat individually. A recent study published in the National Library of Medicine called “Protein to Carb Ration” “informative of a diet quality.” Research shows the closer your carbohydrate and protein grams match the less of a blood sugar elevation (and insulin secretion) you will create. We recommend you look for products with higher (or at least the same) Protein as Carbs, and ignore the trendy unsupported “net” or “active” carb calculations.

When a Carb’s Not a Carb: The Net Carb Debate, WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/women/features/net-carb-debate

Diabetes Daily, What Are ‘Net Carbs’ and Why Do They Matter?, April 2023, https://www.diabetesdaily.com/l

National Library of Medicine; March 2023, The artificial sweetener erythritol and cardiovascular event risk - PubMed (nih.gov) Nat Med. 2023 Mar;29(3):710-718. doi: 10.1038/s41591-023-02223-9. Epub 2023 Feb 27

You may have heard the wise tale to eat a banana if you cramp or to avoid cramping – it’s true, but it may not be enough Potassium. In fact our Brownies has about 50% more Potassium than that Banana without being mushy or those unpleasant brown spots.

It has been studied that the “importance of potassium is highly underestimated.”

In addition to avoiding those painful cramps, Potassium is directly linked to reducing blood pressure, protecting against strokes and preventing osteoporosis and kidney stones.

USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Banana, raw https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/1102653/nutrients

What does Potassium Do for Your Body? A Detailed Review. Healthline, Nutrition https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/what-does-potassium-do

Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook 2nd Ed. For more information contact: Jessica Pellicciotta, MA,RD, villanova.edu/content/dam/villanova/studentlife/documents/healthpromotion/muslce%20cramps.pdf

Harvard School of Public Health, The Nutrition Source, Potassium https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/potassium/

Unlike other oils, Avocados are rich in health fats and easy to extract oil from, meaning there’s no harsh chemicals, solvents or processing.

“The benefits of avocado oil are extensive!” In fact, TIME magazine wrote that Avocado oil is a great choice.” And listed its only downside as “more expensive.”

Research shows avocado oil has beneficial effects on blood cholesterol levels, is high in antioxidants, like carotenoids, and aids in the absorption of key vitamins like A, D, E and K.

US News wrote in 2023, citing to Candace Pumper, a registered dietitian at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, that avocado oil has higher levels of plant sterols (beneficial compounds such as the aforementioned antioxidants and phytosterols). “These compounds have been found to have cholesterol-lowering properties,” Pumper explains.

It is well known to avoid many other types of oil, including Palm Oil, which is found in other “healthy” snack choices. This oil is “high in saturated fat, which means it can boost unhealthy cholesterol and triglycerides and raise the likelihood of heart disease.”

Similarly, TIME highlighted that Sunflower oil is high in Omega 6 polyunsaturated fats and is therefore inflammatory and unhealthy (not to be confused with Omega 3). The article called for “moderation” in consumption of sunflower oil.

TIME Magazine, The 10 Best and Worst Oils for your Health, https://time.com/5342337/best-worst-cooking-oils-for-your-health/

Is Avocado Oil as Health as Avocado Fruit? Snap Kitchen, Sam Presicci, RDN https://blog.snapkitchen.com/is-avocado-oil-as-healthy-as-avocado-fruit/

US News, Comparing Avocado Oil and Olive Oil, 2023 https://health.usnews.com/wellness/food/articles/avocado-oil-vs-olive-oil-what-is-the-difference

Real Simple, Everything to Know About Palm Oil, 2023. https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/shopping-storing/food/what-is-palm-oil

The American Diabetes Association published in 2023 a study showing the relationship between artificial sweeteners and risk of type 2 diabetes. To quote the study “These findings of positive associations between artificial sweetener intakes and increased T2D risk strengthen the evidence that these additives may not be safe sugar alternatives. This study provides important insights in the context of on-going reevaluation of artificial sweeteners by health authorities worldwide.”

John Hopkins University research published in The Global Diabetes Community found that “the study’s results indicate that these [certain popular] sugar substitutes may actually be harmful to those with the metabolic condition.” Further the publication states “While they’re advertised as a healthy alternative for those managing diabetes, new research shows they might actually impede blood glucose regulation.” Additionally that “It was found that the participants in the saccharin and sucralose groups had markable spikes in their blood sugar following the glucose tolerance tests.”

The Medical News Today in 2023 published that “coconut palm sugar has a lower glycemic index than table sugar, it may serve as a suitable alternative.” “At least one research study has found that coconut palm sugar contains significant amounts of inulin. This may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels.” Coconut palm sugar contains less sucrose than some sugars, but it is still 70–80%Trusted Source sucrose, according to an article in the journal Nature. “Overall, coconut palm sugar has a relatively low GI score, compared with other sweeteners.”

The Mayo Clinic stated that artificial sweeteners “may not be as beneficial as once thought…. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea.” - M. Regina Castro, M.D.

The World Health Organization (WHO) released in 2023 a new guideline on non-sugar sweeteners. “The recommendation is based on the findings of a systematic review of the available evidence which suggests that use of non-sugar sweeteners does not confer any long-term benefit in reducing body fat in adults or children. Results of the review also suggest that there may be potential undesirable effects from long-term use of NSS, such as an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mortality in adults." Replacing free sugars with non-sugar sweeteners does not help with weight control in the long term. People need to consider other ways to reduce free sugars intake” says Francesco Branca, WHO Director for Nutrition and Food Safety.

Diabetes Care, July 2023, American Diabetes Association, Artificial Sweeteners and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes https://diabetesjournals.org/care/article/46/9/1681/153434/Artificial-Sweeteners-and-Risk-of-Type-2-Diabetes

The Global Diabetes Community, Diabetes.co.uk, https://www.diabetes.co.uk/news/2022/aug/popular-artificial-sweeteners-found-to-raise-blood-sugar.html

Medical News Today, Can people with diabetes eat coconut palm sugar, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317613

Mayo Clinic, Artificial sweeteners: Any effect on Blook Sugar? https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-answers/artificial-sweeteners/faq-20058038

WHO Advises Against Non-Sugar Sweeteners, May 2023 https://www.worldbakers.com/ingredient/who-advises-against-non-sugar-sweeteners-for-weight-control/

It is well known that Sea Salt is less heavily processed than table salt and is not mined from underground salt deposits, as it is produced through evaporation of saltwater.

Sea Salt intake induced less hypertension than refined salt and caused less damage to the heart and the kidney. It is likely that the major beneficial effect of sea salt is associated with the mineral content of the sea salt that is known to be anti-hypertensive.

The Health Science Academy, Sea Salt vs Table Salt, https://thehealthsciencesacademy.org/sea-salt-vs-table-salt-whats-the-difference/

Food & Nutrition Research, National Library of Medicine, 2017, Natural Sea Salt Consumption confers protection against hypertension, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5328355/